Alexander named manager of Land and Watershed Management program

Susan Alexander has been selected as the new manager of the Land and Watershed Management program, the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station announced.

“I am delighted to have Dr. Alexander join our PNW Research Station Leadership team,” said Robert Mangold, acting station director. “She has a demonstrated track record of doing high-quality science and leading a diverse group of employees for the greatest good.”

Alexander will be based at the Juneau Forestry Sciences Laboratory and officially reports for work on August 12.

The Land and Watershed Management (LWM) program’s scientists and professionals conduct research in Alaska, Washington, and Oregon aimed at better understanding terrestrial, aquatic, and riparian ecosystems and their linkages. The research program, one of seven at the station, explores a diverse range of topics, from water and soil to wildlife and fish.

Alexander is a familiar face at the station, having recently detailed as LWM program manager for four months and having served for nearly 15 years before that as a research scientist with the station, where she focused on recreation valuation and policy, nontimber forest products (NTFP) markets, community involvement, and policy. She currently is the regional economist for the Forest Service’s Alaska Region.

Alexander holds a Ph.D. in forest resources, with a minor in agricultural and resource economics, from Oregon State University, and has authored more than 50 publications on water resources, recreation, NTFPs, wild edible fungi, taxation, and forest management. She also provides leadership to several international organizations, including the International Union of Forest Research Organizations and the Centre for Livelihood and Ecology at Royal Roads University.

“I am looking forward to the opportunity to work with the many successful and capable people in the Land and Watershed Management program and to serving as the lab line officer for the Juneau and Sitka research labs,” Alexander said. “Scientists and professionals in the LWM program do important, ground-breaking research in a variety of fields, and I am excited to support this work.”

The Pacific Northwest Research Station—headquartered in Portland, Ore.—generates and communicates scientific knowledge that helps people make informed choices about natural resources and the environment. The station has 11 laboratories and centers located in Alaska, Washington, and Oregon and about 400 employees. Learn more online at http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw.